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Happy Easter! | Primal French Apple Tart

Happy Easter, everyone!

Unfortunately, today is raining so much! The first time in about a week. Fortunately, the last week has seen absolutely stunning weather. On Good Friday, I woke up in such a bad mood, feeling overwhelmed with the amount of things I had to do, with worries, stress and insecurities, so I decided not to go into work/uni, not to do any of it, and go home to my parents house down the road. Tim didn’t come with me as he was doing his own thing that day. But I’m so glad I went.

We went for a cream tea and a walk at Hazelwood House, an early Victorian house that was the home of the Peek family for generations, just down the road from my parent’s.

“The Peeks were originally tea merchants who later amalgamated with the Freans to become famous for tea and biscuits. In its pre-war hey-day the house was a hub of a 1000 acre estate with four farms; a chapel and a schoolroom for children living on the estate. They even had their own Mausoleum as well as a separate burial ground for staff. Those pre-war years saw dances in the drawing room and Boxing Day meets outside the front door. The beautiful wood-lined stables housed hunters and no less than nine gardeners were employed to keep the gardens. Servants lived on the top floor and estate workers came through the back door to the office behind the kitchen to collect their weekly pay. Post war years saw the decline of this style of living. There were fewer staff; the chapel became a squash court and the schoolroom a billiard room. Keeping up with the extensive gardens, driveways and buildings became too difficult to manage and soon the lifestyle that there once was had gone.”

“In around 1986 the son who was to inherit the estate decided to put Hazelwood on the market. Property developers bought it and sold off the adjoining farms and land leaving 67 acres, the heart of the estate, which they planned to split into 27 small lots and sell off for separate development. It was at this point, in 1988, that the present owners came upon the house and through a miracle found the money to buy it and give it a new lease of life for all to enjoy.”

The sites around Hazelwood House were absolutely beautiful. And there was a sweet little Jack Russell that followed my dad and I when we went walking around the grounds. She was weary of us when we first arrived by soon realised that we meant no harm, and seemed to latch onto us. Any excuse for a walk, I suppose!

We had to book our cream tea in advance because they make the scones fresh on site. Our scones were so fresh that they were warm when we got them! They weren’t your typical scones either, but perhaps made with whole wheat flour and spiced. It made a nice change. :)

We also went for a visit to Topsham, and a little walk around there. It’s the area where my parents live which reminds me of my childhood, and also of video games such as The Legend of Zelda. I believe Shigeru Miyamoto, the creator of said video game, said that he was inspired by the surrounding area of where he grew up in Japan, and that led to him creating the worlds and landscapes where The Legend of Zelda took place. I feel inspired in the same way. :)

I feel so lucky that I live where I live, and I’m so glad that I didn’t move after my undergrad. My parents live in a beautiful area surrounding by rolling green hills and hedgerows, and I’ve moved just down the road to live in the perfect city by the sea. I love where I live: the climate (although more sun and a little more warmth wouldn’t hurt!), the beauty, the people… I’ve been so lucky. I would describe my life as serendipitous, which actually was one of the many names I was thinking of calling my blog, and everything for me has turned out fantastically. I’m so lucky for my family, location, experiences, work, how things have turned out, and even who I am, I suppose. :)

Now, that’s not to say that I’m going to stay in Plymouth forever. I won’t rule out moving, but I certainly am not ready to leave just yet. :)

One thing I’d love to make for my family as a starter is a wild garlic soup. There’s a photo on this page of wild garlic, and it smells lovely. If you squeeze the oils out of the stem, a beautiful and subtle garlic scent is released. I’d also love to make a horseradish also using that found in our wonderful edible hedgerows.

So yes, basically, this Easter I’ve done nothing other than enjoy my family with my newfound happiness (as my PhD is back on track, I feel like I literally have nothing to worry about – other than trivial issues which I’m continually learning from :) ), and eating! One of the pictures here is of some really divine Jeff de Bruges chocolates sent from Ed’s parents from France. They send them every year (which is really very lovely of them :) ) and I love the cute little farm yard animal shapes and Easter themed chocolates. They’re really very smooth and I could eat the whole box to myself.

And I even did my first ever WOD alone!

It sounds pretty trivial but I think (or at least, I hope) it was a big mental barrier broken down for me. I’ve only recently got comfortable doing strength stuff on my own, since starting a 5/3/1 programme at the beginning of the year. But I’ve never really worked out alone. Partly because I dislike it as it’s not fun, but mostly because I never work hard enough, and I get stupidly scared; scared of working too hard, scared of finishing, scared of being tired, scared of being looked at and laughed at. It’s stupid, but it’s true.

I didn’t feel tired whilst doing the WOD, but sometimes I think it’s a subjective thing. I know, though, that I’ll be unhappy with whatever workout I do because I know I just don’t work hard enough, but I’m so afraid of doing so. I really need to get into the mind frame of doing something imperfectly rather than not doing it at all. As Scooby, Tom Venuto, and parts of theOvercoming Gravity book say, that it’s better to do an imperfect workout than waiting for the perfect workout that never happens.

But whether I worked hard or not, hopefully it’s a mental barrier broken for me. I am a very emotional person, and by that I mean that my emotions govern how well I do things. If I’m feeling tentative or scared, then I won’t have a good session and get annoyed and frustrated with myself. If I’m working with people and feeling happy and confident, then it’ll be great. That’s why I work better in group sessions. But now they’re 1.5 hours (rather than 1 hour long) for something like a 20 minutes WOD, I’m better off learning how to suck it up and do it myself to save time.

I just want to get into the mind set of doing things alone and not needing anyone to do anything. If I can work with someone great, but now I don’t have a consistent training partner and I train with various people randomly. I want to not rely on others and stick to my own commitments, regardless of whether other’s can push me and train with me, or not.

The WOD was 5 rounds of:
• 250m row
• 12 alternating pistols
• 12 pull ups
• 90s rest

Anyway, onto the apple tart! I love French apple tart, but here is my almost paleo version… it has double cream in it, so it’s not paleo. But I wonder if it could be replaced with coconut milk to make it so? It can always be made without the creamy base.

I made this for a dinner party at a friend’s house last weekend, and I also made a chocolate mousse tart with an Oreo base. This is actually great with store-bought custard! :P

Oh, and when making this, you don’t need nearly as many apples as you think! I suppose that looking at the tart, it looks like a lot of apples went into it, but an apple goes quite far! :)

Primal French Apple Tart
PaleOMG, BBC Food and 86 Lemons
Serves 8-10

Ingredients
For the crust:
• 2 cups almond flour
• ¾ cup coconut flour
• 2 tbsp coconut oil, melted
• 1 x egg
• 1 tablespoon honey
• 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
• ½ teaspoon baking powder
• ⅛ teaspoon cinnamon

For the filling:
• 15g unsalted butter
• ½ tbsp lemon juice
• 65g honey
• ½ tbsp apple juice/calvados (if not, just lemon juice will be fine!)
• 4 apples (used the standard supermarket ones), washed, core removed and cut into segments (just cut around the core)
• 100 ml double cream
• 1 x egg

Preparation
To prepare the crust, mix all of the ingredients together, and press into 8-9” silicon tart case.

For the filling, heat the butter, lemon juice and 15g (1 tbsp) of honey in a small saucepan until the butter has melted and everything is mixed well. Remove from the heat, stir in the apple juice and set aside.

Preheat the oven to 220°C. Pop the apple segments in concentric circles, overlapping as you go. Brush the apples with the butter mixture, slide the tart into the preheated oven and bake for 10 minutes. Reduce to heat to 200°C and bake for 20 more minutes until the apples have caramelised.

Meanwhile, whisk together the double cream, egg and remaining 50 g of honey until well combined. Pour the mixture over the tart, and bake for a further 10 minutes until the mixture has just set. When I poured the mixture over, it covered most of the apples. If you want the pie to look bursting with apples, I got around it this way: I got 3 more apples, sliced them as before, fried them in butter until they were a similar texture/cooked like the apples in the tart, layered them on top of the mixture, sprinkled with flaked almonds and continued with the baking.

Set aside to cool.

Made 11.04.2014.

Mum’s Plum and Raspberry Crumble | DWF 2014

Mmmmm, I dream about this dish; this crumble is certainly one of my favourites! When mum makes it for my bro and I to have, I’ll usually have the leftovers cold the next morning for breakfast. It really is a delicious dish, hot, cold, with cream, ice cream, leftover chocolate ganache (from making macarons). It really is just delicious and packed with fruit. It’s so comforting; perfect for a winter’s day, or a summer’s evening.

This is a simple dish that gives great results. It can be made ahead, so is perfect to have on a busy day, but the flavours are so good that you can have it for a dinner party dessert. I love this with Cornish ice cream. The topping can also be made ahead and frozen. It’s an Ina Garten recipe; she’s one of my mum’s favourite chefs and she loves to watch The Barefoot Contessa cooking programme.

Hmmm, so any recent news? Nothing too spectacular. I went to Aberdeen last week for the Unconventional Gas conference and stayed with Ed. It was probably the highlight of my PhD; things have been going really well recently, and spending a week in great company tops it off (especially as attending conferences generally motivates me, anyway!). And I bought mum a haggis as a gift from Aberdeen.

Maurizio, Katie and I drove there and back! It took 11 hours to get there, and the journey was smooth. We stopped only once and Maurizio drove all the way. He also drove all the way back, but unfortunately we were stuck in traffic for 3-4 hours, which put a dampener on things, but road trips are always fun with good company! It was also great going out in the evenings with great people, and it’s even better when everyone gets along and talks about varied things!

I also found some beautiful dresses from AX Paris, which is probably now my new favourite place to buy things! I don’t really deviate much from Amazon to be honest, and certainly don’t’ buy clothes online, but I recently bought two beautiful dresses: this beautiful blue cocktail/bodycon dress, and this skater dress.

I told Ed about these dresses, and said to him that if I am able to present in Paris, then I’ll wear the blue dress. And before I knew it, Ed had surprised me by having it delivered to my address! I was quite touched by it, and thought it was really thoughtful, but Ed seemed to think nothing of it really. Some other friends and my mum certainly agree that it was a romantic thing to do! :) <3

Oh, and on April 1st, Google launched their Pokémon challenge! I managed to find just over 100 Pokémon without help (by going to famous landmarks, Japan, etc.). But I needed a few guides (1, 2, 3) to help… either way, it was a great way to procrastinate in uni and a nice way to chill after Crossfit in the evenings while watching South Park or something with my bro before bed. Below are some screenshots of my phone, which turned into my Pokédex, of Japan, London, and I also included screenshots from San Francisco. I love Japan their culture, language and traditions, and of course, London. But San Francisco is one of the more recent places I’ve visited and loved it, so thought I’d pop them in here. That place/trip holds important lessons for me so thought I’d just use screenshots from the very areas I have visited. :D

Anyway, onto the *bigger* news… our team made it to the Divided We Fall (DWF) Games! That means Samantha, Luke, Simon and I have to travel to Cardiff at the beginning of May to compete!

We did 3 qualifying WODs as a team, and had someone to judge us. I was feeling ill when we did them the week before I went to Aberdeen. We did three in the space of, like, 25 hours, and I think those WODs pushed me from being ill to getting pretty ill. I really don’t know how I did what I did when I felt so bad, but I hope I didn’t let my team down! One thing that did really scare me though, was that Luke went blind because he pushed himself so hard… maybe it was s side-effect of the supplement combined with how hard he worked (he did do three rounds of 5 ground-to-overhead at 80k, 10 box jump overs (24”) and 5 toes 2 bar in, like, 3 minutes. It really scared me and I’ve never seen such a thing before. I’d never push myself to that sort of effect but I hope it won’t happen again!

Samantha and I tried our first pre-WOD supplement (literally a shot each), before the guys went to do their 300 wall balls (the guys had to do 300 wall balls between the two of them, and then Samantha and I had to do 300 wall balls between the two of us, and had to do 30 double unders on the minute, every minute, before we could proceed with the wall balls). I don’t know what it was called, but we spoke about a supplement called Jack 3D, and I just Googled the stuff, and two worrying articles appeared: this one, that says it has been banned in Britain because of potential lethal side effects, and this one, that says this guy nearly passed out a few times and had a racing heart. I think I’ll stick to the au naturel way, thank you very much!

Samantha and I got a little hyper because of it, I think. Although it may have been because of the nerves. While the guys were finishing off their 300 wall balls, we were dancing a little! But an idea was to create a pre-WOD cake! If I can make it paleo, the better (yeah, right!), but I’m thinking it’ll have to be as moist and as tasty as the Oreo cake, and as colourful as Rose’s cake to show how it’ll make you feel! Maybe it can have pre-workout stuff, protein powder, post-workout stuff, supplements, etc. I don’t take all of these things, myself, but it’ll be fun to try and incorporate it into a cake!

When I first checked on the night just after all of the scores had to be validated, we were in 42nd place. I have just checked where we are now, and we’re currently 51st, so after the processed the results we moved down quite a significant number of places. :( But fortunately, we were still in the top 100 teams out of 298 teams that registered. Although I counted the number of teams that didn’t’ submit any scores, and that totalled to 83. So I guess we were 51st out of 215 teams. Not too bad I suppose… I’m surprised that more teams didn’t register, but oh well! It’ll be an experience to compete!

I’m really excited, but at the same time so nervous that I’ll let the team down and be the weak link. All I can do is try my hardest, but right now I feel the most unfit I’ve felt in the past couple of years. I’ve really lost motivation for training, and can’t seem to get hold of my nerves at the moment. I always get pretty nervous heading down to the gym/box, but recently it’s been out of control and I need to reign it back in. It’ll be a real challenge but it’s making me get really upset with myself as I’m not being the person I want to be. But at least my teammates are really encouraging and fit themselves. It’s fantastic to train with people who inspire you and are fun to be around.

Maz, who came 2nd in the CrossFit Open for her age category, has asked me and Alan to train with her! We had our first training session on Friday, and it was super fun! She’s got such motivation and is in amazing shape (her age doesn’t even come into play to be honest; she could beat anyone half her age, except for Samantha Briggs, I think!). I’m really inspired by her and she’s so much fun to train with! :)

Thank you Kayleigh for the DWF photos! :)

Anyway, the take home message: when you’re resting (I’ve been doing far too much of that these days…), it’s great to indulge in this delicious crumble. Thanks, mum! This makes me think of you, every time! :) :) :)

My mum gave my brother and I two of these in slightly smaller aluminium trays… I ate a whole one for breakfast with cream. I’m not ashamed! I have a big appetite, ok!

Plum and Raspberry Crumble
Ina Garten, Food Network
Serves 6

Ingredients
For the cake; 2 x 9″ cakes:
• 1 ¼ cup (160g) plain flour, sieved
• ½ cup (45g) rolled oats
• 115g butter (or coconut oil), diced
• ⅔ cup brown sugar
• pinch of salt
• ½ cup (25g) slithered almonds
• 2 tbsp orange juice
• 450g sliced plums
• 2 punnets (500g) raspberries

Preparation
Wash fruit. Preheat oven to 175°C.

Pop the plums, ⅓ cup sugar, ¼ cup flour, orange juice and raspberries in a large baking dish. Toss well so everything is coated nicely.

In a bowl, add 1 cup flour, ⅓ cup sugar and salt into a food processor. Add the butter and pulse until the butter is the size of peas. Pour the mixture back into the bowl and add the oats, working with your hands until it’s a crumbly mixture. Add the almonds, mix well and spread on top of the plum and raspberry mix.

Sprinkle with some extra almonds, if desired, and pop into the oven for 45 minutes until the fruit is tender and bubbly, and the top is golden brown.

These particular crumbles were made in March 2014.

Vegan Carrot Cake with a Cream Cheese Frosting | Spring Has Arrived (as has the Exam Period!)

It’s now spring and the weather recently has been spectacular! Two days ago was the deadline of the last piece of coursework for the academic year of my brother’s course, and now he’s freeeee and can enjoy a summer of training hard. BUT, it is the start of the spring exam period… doh! But at least Tim prefers exams to coursework. :)

In order to celebrate the coming of spring and to help get Tim through his exams, I decided to make my most favourite carrot cake recipe! I’ve also made this into a paleo version (with paleo icing and everything!), and will hopefully post that soon. :)

Actually, the real reason to make this carrot cake was to take it to a friend’s housewarming party. However, Tim and I ended up eating most of it before the party… and so I had to quickly whip something up the night before and it turned into some ooey-gooey peanut butter bar things. They were delicious, but I did feel very fat for having eaten something I was going to take. But it was just so good and I have no self control! I’m sure many people can relate though… right? But the cake that was leftover, I took to the party, and was offered a place to stay in her house because of my baking. Woop woop!

Carrot cake is one of my all time favourite cakes. It has to be moist, with not too much frosting, but not too little, either. It has to be light, and slightly sweet, but not too sweet (i.e. no sugar in the frosting and not too much, if any, in the cake). It also has to have plenty of nuts and dried fruits of different varieties, and chocked full of carrot.

This carrot cake recipe, in my opinion, is pure perfection. The cake itself is soft and moist, full of nuts and fruits and plenty of carrot. The icing is smooth and delicate, and the cake satisfies a sweet tooth without being too sweet. The ratio of icing to cake is perfect, and one doesn’t overpower the other. Carrot cake, I believe, is the ultimate combination of flavours and is sheer bliss.

To decorate this cake, I used some crushed cocoa beans from Hotel Chocolat, and it made the cake look more like a white chocolate cake, but I really wanted to try and decorate it like this! Otherwise, I would have used pecans, walnuts, or pistachios to decorate. In some ways I wish I had made it distinctively a carrot cake, as I do usually, but I quite like this presentation. I think it looks soft and very eye-catching!

The cocoa beans are the ones to use in a cafetière, and I bought them when I was in Aberdeen visiting Ed. He influences me so much, and he makes coffee over the hob from a little moka pot; it’s so cute and I love the smell and the idea of brewing coffee over the stove, but I just don’t like coffee! So this is a lovely alternative. :)

When I first made this cake a few years ago, mum took a bit and asked if I had soaked the dried fruit in orange juice. She noticed! She said she bit into a raisin and it burst with flavour. So I definitely recommend soaking the dried fruit for as long as possible.

The frosting I tried to use when last making this cake was a Swiss meringue buttercream, but it failed miserably. In fact, the frosting itself tasted fine and the carrot cake was beautiful, as usual, but it just looked like someone had puked all over the cake and was quite off-putting and unappealing. And in actual fact, I do prefer cream cheese frostings because, yes, they’re easier than meringue frostings, but I find that the cheese compliments the carrots and spices in the cake so much better than a super-sweet meringue icing. Although, the very first time I tried a cream cheese frosting, it was really lumpy! This time, I actually bothered sifting the icing sugar and melted the butter and cheese together to ensure that it was well homogenised. Yes, the little extra effort is almost always worth it (yet another life lesson learnt through baking escapades!).

Failed Swiss meringue buttercream from 18.08.2011…

Anyway, back to this cake; it’s so delicious with double cream and fresh strawberries and blueberries. The flavorus complement one another and the tastes are indescribable. Seriously, try it for yourself! To me, it’s reminiscent of something you’ve have at Wimbledon. :)

I struggled for ages with the composition when taking photos. I’m not sure at first if I really liked the orange colour, but I think it looks nice with the brown of the cocoa beans, nuts, the paper cocoa bean bag, and the cream frosting.

And to end this post, I’ll leave you with some witty Little Britain dialogue (as I did with the banoffee pie!):

”Carrot cake, carrot cake, have ye any nuts?”

Friday’s WODs @ CFP:
DWF qualifying WOD 2 and WOD 3 with Samantha, Simon and Luke! :)

Vegan Carrot Cake with a Cream Cheese Frosting
Apt 2 Baking and The Little Epicurian
Makes 2 x 9″ cakes

Ingredients
For the cake:
• 2 ¼ cups flour, sifted
• 1 ½ tsp cinnamon
• 1 tsp ginger
• ½ tsp nutmeg
• 1 tsp all spice
• 1 ½ tsp baking soda
• ½ tsp baking powder
• 1 cup pecans, almonds, pistachios, walnuts, macadamia nuts…
• ¼ cup toasted coconut
• ⅛ cup dried goji berries
• ⅛ cup cocoa beans, crushed/broken
• 1 cup orange juice
• ½ cup mixed dried fruit
• ½ cup groundnut oil
• 1 cup brown sugar
• 2 cups grated carrot (about 2 large carrots)

For the frosting:
• 450g tub of soft cheese/cream cheese
• ½ cup (115g) butter
• 1 ¼ cups icing sugar, sifted
• pinch of salt

Preparation
For the cake:
Add the mixed dried fruit in a medium-sized bowl with the orange juice, and leave to soak for 45 minutes (overnight would be better).

Preheat oven to 175°C.

In a large bowl, sift in the flour, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, all spice, baking soda, and baking powder. Add in the nuts, toasted coconut, dried goji berries, and cocoa beans.

In the bowl with the fried fruit, grate in the carrot, add the sugar and groundnut oil.

Pour in the wet ingredients with the dry ingredients, and pour into 2 x 9″ silicon cake moulds, and pop into the oven for 20-25 minutes, or until a knife or toothpick inserted into the middle of the cakes comes out clean. Take out of the oven and leave to cool in the moulds on the kitchen worktop.

For the frosting:
Melt the butter in a large Pyrex bowl in the residual heat of the oven (or you can turn the oven back on, or do it over the hob). Then add in the soft cheese and mix well until homogenised. Leave to cool to room temperature before sifting in the icing sugar and salt, and mixing well.

Assembly:
When the cakes have cooled, remove one from the mould/tin, and put it on a plate (be careful, the cakes are delicate!). Spread a layer of the frosting on top, and then carefully place the other cake on top. Cover the assembled cake in cream cheese frosting, putting it all on top, and using a knife to spread it around the outside. Decorate as desired, with nuts, carrots, cocoa beans, etc. Keep in the fridge. When the cake is cool, it will be easier to move to another, cleaner plate.

Baked: 28.02.2014

Quick Bordelaise Sauce | Stand Up for Yourself

Ahhh March… the first sign that winter is ending and that spring is a’coming! :D So it’s time to get out some lovely spring vegetables, such as asparagus, and to pair is with an equally sophisticated sauce!


Asparagus is a sexy vegetable. Let’s face it, it looks delicate and exotic, even though it’s really a robust, strong and hardy vegetable. It looks different to most vegetables, and breaks free from the ground, defying gravity and shows everyone that it’s here! It even sounds foreign – those sexy ‘s’ and ‘r’ sounds make is so much more distinctive from something such as everyday ‘broccoli,’ which sounds like ‘brick,’ or something.

Steamed asparagus is so beautiful, but it’s one of those vegetables that’s so easy to overcook and then it goes all mushy and soft. Although it’s not one of my favourite green vegetables, when compared to something I love such as cabbage or kale, I do love the prospect of eating it; it’s so exotic-looking that I get really excited when I see it on my plate, but it’s a little bit stringy in texture if you eat the whole stalk (asparagus tips steamed well are really delicious, though). When steaming, once the water has boiled in your steamer, your asparagus is probably cooked. Check it by stabbing your fork into the thickest portion of the stalk. If it pierces it easily, then it’s done. Take it from the heat straight away. If left any longer, it will cook in an instant! You have to keep an eye on your asparagus.

But now that I’ve gone on about my love for asparagus, and before talking about the sauce, let’s talk about life.

There’s so much going on at the moment. With Crossfit, there are quite a lot of competitions coming up. This is the first weekend of the CrossFit Open… 14.1, which I haven’t entered (for many reasons!), but I think I’ll just do the WODs for fun if I can. The first WOD for DWF (Divided We Fall) has also been released, and with my awesome team of Samantha, Simon and Luke, it should be quite fun. :) I do like team WODs… I usually work harder than I would by myself, providing that I’m not too nervous or feel like I’m letting anyone else down!

But, last week was one of the most stressful weeks I’ve had during the PhD I’ve had so far. To be honest, I have been fairly depressed and suffering from PhD Depression for most, if not all, of my PhD so far. I know I’m not the only one (seriously, just Google “PhD depression”), but I sure feel alone at times. I have the support from many, and I’m so thankful for that, but sometimes it just feels like there’s no way out.

I feel like an imposter, and that I don’t know enough. Whatever I do isn’t good enough and won’t please everyone… and the stress and demands are really brutal at times. The thing is, I enjoy the work and the scientific enquiry, the challenge… but I can’t cope with feeling so stupid all of the time. I think I know my strengths and weaknesses, but sometimes that just isn’t enough and it all becomes so overwhelming.

The whole PhD has actually turned me into a depressive person. I think I’m quite good at putting my mood behind me. If I’ve had a bad day in the office or lab, I won’t let it affect my Crossfit, a week with my other half, or a weekend with my family… but it will ruin an evening alone, because I just can’t switch my mind off. In some ways, I say to myself that when I get a job, it’ll be different, but deep down, I know it won’t be. I’m a natural born worrier and I’m going to have to learn to deal with that and develop different habits.

But last week was very character building for me, as I got myself into hot water (a.k.a. touble!). Basically, I have issues with my project, and instead of going to my first supervisor, I went to my second. This didn’t go down well what-so-ever. I can see why my first supervisor got upset, but he was very reasonable with it all, I feel. I still have the same issues with the project, but maybe as a lesson for my own assertiveness, I should bring them up as they arise, rather than wait. Although in my defence, I didn’t realise they were issues at the time, until I looked back on them and realised that certain things shouldn’t have happened, etc. Now, I appreciate that everyone’s only human, but I still feel that so many things shouldn’t have happened in order to have made for a smoother project.

Anyway, I could talk about this and make a whole post of it, but I won’t. My friends know what I’m talking about and I don’t feel that I should air my dirty washing/laundry in public. So I shan’t. But I do feel a little unfairly treated and reprimanded like a child. So instead of being talked to, my funding was threatened. So of course, I got a little ill last week just because of the sheer stress of it all, because of the potential bad relations that may have been between me and my supervisors, but also, of course, the prospect of having to find a job and spending almost three years on a road to nothing. I’m only just getting over it and my mild-flu.

Anyway, let’s talk about this dish! :)

Bordelaise sauce, according to Wikipedia, is a classic French sauce named after the Bordeaux region of France, which is famous for its wine. The sauce is made with dry red wine, bone marrow, butter, shallots and sauce demi-glace (a rich brown sauce used as a base). This sauce is adapted from an AllRecipes recipe, and it tastes very rich and elegant without going to much hassle at all. Although I guess technically, it couldn’t be a Bordelaise sauce, as it doesn’t have bone marrow (unless you wanted to add some!).


I seared the beef steak with a grill pan in order to try to get some lovely sear marks on it. I always call those pans a “Jamie Oliver pan,” as they always just remind me of him… I swear he uses them almost all the time! But I had to smear a small amount of oil on each side of the steaks in order to get the marks… otherwise it just wouldn’t work!

I think this sauce would go really well with any dark meat, such as lamb, beef, or even liver. I cooked this for Ed and I in Aberdeen a couple of weeks ago (wow, where does time go?!), and we had it with veal, steamed vegetables, leftover sweet potato and apple mash, and honey-roasted parsnips. Mmmmmm. I think if you added in double cream, it’ll work just as well, although of course will add a different dimension to the dish, rather than being rich and dark.

I would also quite happily eat this as a soup! I was taking photos of it in the white bowl, and my brother immediately exclaimed “that looks really nice… can I have it?” He was very disappointed when I told him that I’m going to be taking photos of it the following day, so will have to wait. I went out and bought a specific bowl from Marks and Spencer, because Ed had these really nice shallow white bowls with a rim. They looked great with everything and anything in it! I’ve never really been into shallow bowls, but these “pasta bowls” just make everything in it look great.

As Ed currently has no Tupperware, I put the remainder of our Bordelaise sauce in one of these white “pasta bowls.” It just looked amazing and I wanted to take a photo of it then and there! But I didn’t (because it was dark at the time), so I decided that I would do it myself when I got back to Plymouth. :) Ed also has lovely plates, as you can see in the photos: the yellow Mediterranean-looking ones. And he even had this brown-blue-white plate that was very sophisticated-looking, and I used it to take photos of the chocolate-walnut brownie torte. So after all my babble, what I’m trying to say is that even though Ed was moaning about his kitchen (he really seemed to want to do it up!), he had some lovely plates that I just wanted to take back to Plymouth with me. :)


Although I do like white plates (as they’re guaranteed to display any food well and look good in pictures), I invested in four more, too: a beautiful blue plate that I bought with Ed, a wooden pant pot stand (that I’ll use as a plate), a small, white rectangular plate, and a larger and flatter white, rectangular plate with a sauce dish. You’ll see them featured in my photos a lot more from now on, and I think now is the right time, too, as my photography is getting better, I’d like to experiment with different plates, colours and backgrounds, too.

I hope to go back to Aberdeen in three week’s time… it’ll be to go to the Unconventional Gas conference to promote the research groups porous structure modelling software and its applications in fracking. This means, of course, that I will get to see Ed! I believe two of my colleagues will stay in the city centre, and hopefully I can stay at Ed’s! My two colleagues are hoping to drive up, and are going up regardless of whether I go or not, so not only will we have a fun road trip, but me tagging along for personal development, means that I don’t have to pay any extra for travel, anything for accommodation, and only £25 (as a student) to enter the conference for a day! I think that’s just an opportunity on a plate! :)

Sunday’s WOD:
NOTHING! :D

Oh, it’s pancake day on Tuesday! :)

Bordelaise-esque Sauce
Adapted from: All Recipes
Makes enough sauce for 4-6

Ingredients
• 1 tbsp butter
• 1 x kg shallots (or 2 x large leeks), diced
• 1 tsp garlic, crushed
• 500 g of chestnut mushrooms, sliced
• 250 ml (1 cup) beef stock (or vegetable stock to make it vegetarian)
• 85 ml (⅓ cup) red wine
• 1 tbsp Worcestershire sauce (or soy sauce or balsamic vinegar)
• 2 x bay leaves
• a bunch of fresh thyme, washed
• 1 heaped tbsp cornstarch (or arrowroot powder to make it more primal)

Preparation
Melt the butter in a saucepan and add the garlic and shallots and/or leeks. Sauteé until translucent. In the meantime, pick the leaves off of the thyme, and chop the thyme stalks. Throw in the mushrooms, bay leaves and diced thyme stalks, and cook until soft. Add the wine, beef broth and sauce/vinegar. Bring to the boil and then turn down to a simmer until the sauce reduces slightly. Maybe 20 minutes or so. Dissolve the cornstarch in a mug in 4 tbsps of cold water, and add into the saucepan. Simmer for about 10 more minutes, remove the bay leaves, and serve. :)

Deep Dish Paleo Berry Pie | An Ode to Pie

Ahh pie. So comforting. There’s nothing like burying your problems, woes, and tackling procrastination by tucking into a large serving of pie with a heavy helping of clotted cream (hmmm, on further introspection, this is not a healthy habit; I should do something about this)…

I can’t believe it’s the end of January already; I’ve never understood the cliché phrase “Where does the time go?” more at any point of my life than I do now. I guess being busy is a good sign, because it means that my glass is full, overflowing if you will.

I’m not one to make New Year’s resolutions, because I don’t believe that you need a new year to make goals. Why is a new year going to be any different to the previous one if you don’t make changes? Once the clock strikes midnight, and it’s no longer December 31st, but January 1st… how has your life changed in such a way that your goals are finally achievable?

What I’m trying to say, is that New Year’s resolutions are goals that you must have been holding dear to your heart and think of often, so why is it that overnight you can suddenly achieve your goals? Heck, you don’t even need a new week to start new goals and decide that you’re going to go for it. You just need a new moment, or the present. And I think that’s what commitment is; deciding that you want to achieve your goals at every new moment, rather just because it’s customary to do so at a particular time.

Anyway, the goals I am working towards, in no particular order (not resolutions, because these are things I’ve been working on for a while, and haven’t made just because it’s a new year!):
1. Start writing thesis;
2. Get better at running, rowing, and endurance-y stuff;
3. Get really strong!
4. Try my hardest to fit in Spanish studies;
5. Eat clean and to not be influenced by bad eating habits and the eating habits of others;
6. Be happy and continue my spiritual growth.

Last week, I had some good news with my PhD! I was in contact with a Japanese researcher, who invited me to study in his lab if I could obtain a JSPS Fellowship. However, Omya will not allow me to go because of patents, secrecy of research, etc. Nevermind! Perhaps this is something for a future endeavour. :) And I also received an email saying that I was “accepted” to present at a conference… in Hawaii! Well, I’ve made the first hurdle! My abstract was accepted, and now I need to hand in a manuscript, and from there, they’ll decide if they really do want me to present. But to be honest, I doubt I’ll be able to get adequate results in such a short space of time, and even if I was, I don’t think I’d obtain the funding to be able to go. This saddens me, however I will try my hardest, and if it doesn’t happen, then it just wasn’t meant to be.

Anyway, I still made time to post this pie recipe this week, and bake a few other things, as well as take photos of them (and post them to Facebook). There’s no point in saying “I’ll wait until I’ve done this to do my hobby” or something similar… you just have to grab it. Which is why I bake and take photos; I love it! It reminds me that life is something to be enjoyed NOW and not to be put off for another time. You have to MAKE time for your achievements, for your work, for your family and hobbies, and you have to sacrifice and prioritise for them all. I personally think that you can have and do it all, but just not at once.

And, onto the pie!

I didn’t really expect much from this pie… I just sort of threw it together. I felt like making something hearty and relatively healthy (compared to other desserts). But now I think it’s going to be a delightful addition to my repertoire of recipes! I mean, sure, it’s a paleo pie, but even if you’re not on the paleo diet, this pie is absolutely fantastic and I really prefer it to conventional pies, as it’s not too sweet. I used cherries and blueberries, but you could easily use other fruits. Favourite combinations of mine are apple and blackberry, forest fruits, and peach and raspberry (my mum makes a delicious peach and raspberry crumble… mmmmmm!).

I made this for one weekend when we were all together at my parents’ and we had this with mum’s rib-eye beef! Was delicious!


The morning that I had baked this pie, my brother and I were working in the living room, and the pie was cooling on the kitchen worktop. I went into the kitchen with the lights off, and the light from the living room was shining through the serving hatch and illuminated the pie in such a picturesque and angelic way that I had to capture it was it was! I’ve never been a fan of using indoor lights, and always try to use natural lighting, but I had a good tripod and the right angle, and I think the pictures below came out beautifully, despite the darkness and small amount of fake light!

I also took photos at my parents’ house, because I absolutely love their rustic kitchen as it’s large and beautiful, and full of light, but I really struggled with the composition. Well, more so the lighting and angles to make it look delectable without making the colours look flat. The typical example would be taking photos of salads: with the right lighting and angles they can look crisp and delicious, but with the wrong lighting (i.e. in a dark restaurant with a flash) it can look limp, boring and lifeless.

I love how the crust of the pie is stained purple, and the colours inside. :) And how it looks so impressive yet is so simple to put together! And, a great gift idea would be mini pies!

The pie is delicious when hot and straight from the oven, with a generous dollop of clotted cream. But then this is also wonderful cold with double cream as well. If you leave it for a day after baking and before eating, the flavours mingle with one another and with the pie case. It’s perfect all year round: hot in the winter, and cold in the summer!

The pie case is also great for savoury pies, because it’s not sweetened with coconut flour, it goes with every taste! I used it to make a savoury beef pie that was absolutely delicious! :)

Thursday training:
1km run into a 100m farmer’s walk 16/24kg
800m run into a 100m farmer’s walk 16/24kg
600m run into a 100m farmer’s walk 16/24kg
400m run into a 100m farmer’s walk 16/24kg
1 min pull up rig hang (weighted if possible)
400m run into a 100m farmer’s walk 16/24kg
600m run into a 100m farmer’s walk 16/24kg
800m run into a 100m farmer’s walk 16/24kg
1km run into a 100m farmer’s walk 16/24kg

Deep Dish Paleo Berry Pie
Serves 8-10
Case adapted from: Elana’s Pantry; filling adapted from The Yoghurt Pot

Ingredients
For the pie case:
• 4 cups almond flour
• 4 tbsp coconut oil, melted (approx. 2 heaped tbsp coconut oil if hard)
• 2 x eggs

For the filling:
• 350g cherries, pitted (fresh or thawed from frozen)
• 350g blueberries, (fresh or thawed from frozen)
• 250g mixed dried fruits (soaked overnight in hot water)
• 3 generous tbsp maple syrup/honey
• 2 tsp ground cinnamon
• 1 tsp arrowroot powder (optional)

Preparation
Drain the dried fruit that has been soaked overnight in water. Mix all of the ingredients for the filling together in a saucepan, bring to the boil, and let simmer for around 10 minutes (if not using arrowroot powder, maybe simmer for 15 minutes to evaporate a little more of the liquids?). Then set aside.

In the meantime, prepare your pie cast. Mix all of the in a large bowl and homogenise well with the back of a spoon. Line a cake tin with baking paper (my cake tin had a removable base, and was 15cm in diameter and 8 cm in height), and press the case mixture all around the cake tin, ensuring that the walls are thick enough to hold the weight of the fruits. (I used about ¾ of the mixture for the base and walls, and the remaining for the top.)

Pour in the berry filling. Then pat the remaining pastry mixture on top of the filling. Make sure to seal as best as you can any gaps between the lid and the walls of the case, without splashing juice anywhere!

Pop the pie into a preheated oven at 200°C for 20 minutes, and then turn the oven down to 160°C for 15 minutes. I then let my pie cool in the oven.

If you wish to present the pie to guests, I recommend to cool the pie entirely before removing it from its tin, so that it holds its shape better.

This is delicious straight from the oven when hot and fresh, but is also beautiful the next day, as the juices inside become a sauce, and the flavours mingle with each other and the pastry case.

Bon appétit! :)

Baked and constructed: 24.01.2014 @ the Kung Fu Kitchen! :)

Tribal Clash 2013 | Apple “Coffee” Cake & Upside Down Summer Berry Sponge



Wow, where do I start? I’m currently in a nice hotel in Reno just waiting for our flight home from the amazing PrimalCon Lake Tahoe 2013! I have so many things to write about but that’s for another post! I was supposed to briefly write about another event that took place at the end of August. Although it feels like it was eons away, it will always hold a special place in my heart: The Tribal Clash 2013.


The Tribal Clash was seriously an epic event, with brilliantly crafted WODs, squatting 50kg logs, ocean swims, tribal runs up and down huge hills through a trail run, running on shingle (hardest thing I’ve ever done!), tyre deadlifts, beam pull ups, the works! I learned that I’m not actually bad at running, and I’m actually not bad at all at swimming, either! I hadn’t swam since school, and I think I did really well! If improved my technique, who knows? That’s just another thing I need to learn to do with everything else!

The same team wants to go again with me next year, so hopefully we’ll be more prepared! We were first in every heat, which gave us a serious disadvantage. I believe we came 30th overall out of 100 teams; after the first day we were 12th. Not bad considering we had no strategy for any of the WODs and just winged it! Next year will hopefully be just, if not more, epic! :)




The reason I have chosen this particularly unhealthy recipe was because my mum made it that weekend (and the weekend before I believe!). She made a delicious apple cake with fresh apples from our garden, my grandmother’s garden and the garden of our local friends! :) Actually, at PrimalCon, chef Rachel Albert demonstrated some delicious reecipes with apples – some I’ll definitely be trying soon and then posting on here! :)

The apple cake (which I’m quite proud of how the photos turned out; I really struggled at first, but think I got there in the end!) was used with a third less sugar than the recipe called for. In fact, I think a lot more of the sugar can be omitted. And of course, the apples can be subbed with various other fruits. The sponge was very soft, especially straight from the oven, and with double cream it was divine! This cake will make a great basis for other flavours and fruits! Great to take on picnics, good to give away, for impromptu coffees with friends, etc. It really is an all purpose cake, but the name sounds too plain! It should last for a few days and keep its springiness!

We tried it with berries following this simple fruit sponge recipe, and although it turned out really nicely, it wasn’t cooked in the middle. We tried it about three times, and each time the outside was starting to burn but the inside remained uncooked. I think a lower temperature fro longer *should* do the trick! You can see from the pictures above that the inside was rather “smushy.” But it was still really creamy in texture and super silky soft. Either way, it was delicious!

Apple “Coffee” Cake
Adapted from: BCC Good Food 1 and 2

Ingredients
For the cake:
• 125 g softened butter
• 80 g caster sugar
• 3 x eggs, beaten
• 50 g ground almonds
• 100 g self-raising flour
• 2 x large apples (i.e. the size of cooking apples), cut into chunks
• 75 g raisins or sultanas
• cinnamon

For the topping:
• 2 tbsp brown sugar
• 2 tbsp softened butter
• a handful of flaked almonds

Preparation
Heat an oven to 160°C. Beat all of the cake ingredients together in a bowl, and transfer to a silicon baking dish. Add the topping ingredients evenly to the top of the cake. You can even reserve some apple to do so, too! Pop into the oven for 50-55 minutes until a skewer/knife inserted into the middle comes out clean.

Pan-Fried Lamb Chops with Mushrooms, Peas and Sprouts in a Creamy Sauce and Avocado and Pea Salsa | Tim’s Trip to the Pyrenees



Weeelll this week has been really busy! My brother has been away for 12 days in the Pyrenees on a geology field trip, and so I’ve been cooking really simple food… although there’s no reason it still can’t be full of flavour! But of course, the first morning Tim was back, we had pancakes ^_^

Tim really enjoyed his trip and I’m glad he did! Not only did he make some new friends on his course but he got a picture with Professor Iain Stewart, but unfortunately his friend has the photo! Tim also volunteered to help record some information about Geology in a bid to make an educational geological video, and I popped a YouTube video at the bottom of one! I’m really impressed with it and proud of my bro! I think he speaks really well and he did it without a script or any practice! :)

Edit (03.10.2013):Tim and Iain :)



Anywho, a couple of weeks ago I picked up half a lamb from a guy at Crossfit whose other half’s cousin owns a farm in Ugborough, and so this stuff is supposed to be grass fed, organic, free-range, and all that good stuff. Now thsi lamb is awesome! I have just over 10kg of the stuff: chops, neck, shoulder, legs, etc. All I can say is that my freezer is full!

I think this dish was really simple, but really tasty… although there are a lot of different flavours, they seem to work well together. I really enjoyed the lemon zing in the avocadoes… I made that last night with my parents after we celebrated me passing my transfer! Friday 13th now has a new meaning to me! And the creamy sauce with the lamb is really nice, too; makes a change from gravy! Not only is it really simple but you really don’t need much cream to add a whole new dimension to the dish. The cream mixed with the lamb juices makes such a nice and delicate sauce that goes so well with sprouts, mushrooms, peas, and leeks.

I also couldn’t choose how many photos to take; they all look quite similar, but I just like the colours so much. The photos look a bit too busy for my liking, but what’re you gonna do? ^_^

Saturday’s WODs:
Advanced:
Max reps of (4 rounds):
BW bench press
Strict pull ups
Strict HSPUs
2 x BW deadlifts

Then 20 minutes to achieve:
1RM of 2 x full snatch into 1 x full hang snatch
max. reps muscle ups

The session was so busy this morning and hectic! Boo!

Intermediate:
In pairs, 20 minute AMRAP: each do alternating rounds of Cindy while the other does burpees! (Cindy = 5 pull ups, 10 press ups, 15 squats)

Me and Emily = 236 burpees and 14 rounds of Cindy, rx’d. :)

They were both fun but I need to push myself more! Whenever things start to get uncomfortable, I always pull back, and if I continue sometimes I get teary and upset. Why? What is wrong with me?!

Pan-Fried Lamb Chops with Mushrooms, Peas and Sprouts in a Creamy Sauce and Avocado and Pea Salsa
Avocado salsa/salad adapted from: Home Cooking Adventure
Serves 1-2

Ingredients
For the avocado salsa:
• 1 x avocado
• 1 x cup spring onion, chopped
• ¼ cup raw peas
• 2 x garlic cloves, minced
• 3 tbsp lemon juice

For the lamb and cream sauce:
• 2-4 x lamb chops
• 2 x cloves of garlic, minced
• 1 x small onion, diced
• ~200 g button mushrooms, halved
• ~½ cup of peas
• 2 tbsp dried rosemary
• splash of double cream
• sprinkling of pine nuts

Preparation

For the avocado salsa:
Mash the avocado in a bowl, and fold and mix in the rest of the ingredients.

For the lamb and cream sauce:
Pop the lamb chops in a large non-stick fryign pan on low until you your them start to sizzle and the juices start to run out. Then turn the heat up to medium and add the onions, garlic, mushrooms and rosemary. Continue to dry until the garlic is fragrant, the onion is translucent, and the mushrooms have soaked up the lamb juices. If the lamb is cooked to your liking before the rest of the dish is ready, take the lamb off the plate or push it to the side of the pan. Add the peas about 1 minute before you turn off the heat.

When ready to serve, turn off the heat, put the lamb on the plates and add a splash of double cream to the pan, and mixing in with the juices, mushrooms, onions, etc. Serve over the lamb chops, sprinkle some pine nuts and enjoy with the avocado salsa. :)

Enjoyed solo: 11.09.2013

Spotted Dick with Cherry Compote and Vanilla Bean Custard


For Father’s Day, I asked dad what I could cook for him as a ‘gift.’ He asked for Thai Green Curry and Spotted Dick.


This recipe I found called for a strawberry and rhubarb rather than cherries. I was going for blueberries, but there weren’t any in the fridge, even though I swear that there were! So I opted for cherries! It would have been nice to have had more (so I doubled the amount that I used in the recipe below), as mine only just managed to cover the top.

Ours was with a vanilla bean custard, which was extremely good! But I made mine ahead and reheated it later, but unfortunately it was a little lumpy and not too attractive to the eye. However it still tasted delicious. :-)


Here’s a nice image of dad and his mum on Mother’s Day in 2008. And a handsome image of Tim, just thrown into the mix :-)

Spotted Dick with Cherry Compote
Adapted from: There’s A Newf in My Soup
Serves 16

Ingredients
For the cherry compote:
• 300g cherries, pitted
• 1 tbsp sugar
• 1 x sachet gelatine
• 2 tbsp brandy
• 2 tbsp lemon juice

For the spotted dick:
• butter and flour, for greasing
• 10 tbsp/170g butter or suet
• 1¼ cups/300g sugar
• 4 x eggs
• 1 tsp vanilla extract
• 1 tsp cinnamon
• 2¾ cups/340g self-raising flour
• 3 tablespoons milk
• 1 cup/150g dried fruit

Preparation
For the cherry compote:
Mix the sugar and gelatine in a bowl. Then add the cherries, lemon juice and brandy, and simmer over low heat until thick and syrupy – about 15 minutes.

In the meantime, butter a cake tin, then dust with flour (knocking the excess out).

Pour the syrup in the bottom of the tin, arranging the cherries (without burning yourself!) in a pretty fashion. Leave to cool at room temp. until set.

For the spotted dick:
Trace a circle on parchment paper slightly larger than the cake tin, and cut out.

Melt the butter in a large bowl, add the sugar, and cream with a wooden spoon until pale and smooth. Add the eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition. Add the vanilla and mix well.

Sift the flour into the mixture, and beat until well combined. Then add the milk and beat, also. Dollop the mixture on top of the cherry compote, and flatten out.

Fill a large, shallow pan with water, and put some metal cookie cutters or something in the bottom to create a platform on which to place the cake tin, about 1” above the water. Bring the water to a boil, and then turn the heat down so it simmers.

Put the cake tin on top of the platform, cover the tin with the parchment paper, and put the lod on the pan. Steam for about 1 ¼ – 1 ½ hours. If using little ramekins, it will be about 1 hour.

The spotted dick will puff up a lot. I used a bread knife to even the bottom of mine before I inverted it onto a plate, and sliced it, and served it with homemade vanilla custard. :-)

Vanilla Bean Custard
Adapted from: Bite My Thumb
Serves 4-6

Ingredients
• 3 x egg yolks
• 1 cup/250ml double cream
• 1/2 vanilla bean, seeds scraped out (1 tsp vanilla essence)
• 3 tbsp sugar

Preparation
Boil water in a small saucepan.

Whisk the cream and egg yolks in a Pyrex bowl until smooth throughout. Then add the vanilla bean seeds (or vanilla essence) and sugar, and whisk until homogeneous.

Place the bowl over the simmering water (this is known as a bain-marie), and whisk continuously so no lumps form. The mixture should be whisked for about 10 minutes, or until the mixture thickens and forms a custard like colour and consistency.

Remove the bowl from the pan and pour over your dessert, and enjoy :-)

Enjoy :-)

Enjoyed: 19.06.2011

Bakewell Tart | Final Match of the Season

Firstly, I would like to say “Happy Graduation, Mum!” Mum finally graduated on Saturday with a BA (Hon) in Social Sciences! She’s just got one more module to go, before she gets a BSc (Hons)! She made me so proud, and gave me that extra motivation I needed to keep on revising and to do well in my final year exams.

Secondly, tonight is the last match of the 2010/11 season. It’s pretty sad, but I’m quite looking forward to tonight; win or lose, they’re going to be tough games! We’re playing against Derriford, and last time we played against them, they were tough! Perhaps some tart might slow them down? Hehe…

I wanted to make something special, but easy to make. This didn’t take very long, but I think the results look as though it did!


For those of you who are familiar with Mr. Kipling’s delicious, but very naughty, Cherry Bakewells, then you might find that these are quite different. I really want to try next time to make cherry bakewells just like Mr. Kipling’s, but I stuck with this recipe I found, first.

I always thought Bakewells involved frangipane, but I think it’s just depends on what recipe you use. According to Wikipedia, a Bakewell tart is a shortcrust pastry with a layer of jam and almond sponge filling, which is then covered with a layer of fondant (which sounds quite similar to the Cherry Bakewells by Mr. Kipling). Whereas the Bakewell pudding is flaky pastry with a layer of jam and an egg and almond filling. Apparently, they’re both quite different with regards to appearance, flavour and texture, but I’ve yet to try a Bakewell pudding. Right, that’s the next things on my “To Make” list!


The colour of the tart doesn’t look too appetising, but that’s because I mixed the raspberries in with the sponge; perhaps I should have scattered them across the pastry base first, but I didn’t: oh well!

I also found that the pastry shrank a little when I pre-cooked it. I think next time I’ll make sure there’s a little hanging over the sides, as once it’s cooked, you can always cut it off afterwards. And I used my mum’s trusty silicon moulds; not only are they non-stick, but they let you remove your pie with ease, and they’re great to clean!

Bakewell Tart
Adapted from: BBC Good Food
Yields 2 x 8″ tarts

Ingredients
For the shortcrust pastry (source: Serial Cooking):
• 225g plain flour
• 30g sugar
• ½ tsp salt
• 110g buter, melted
• 2 x egg yolks
• ½ tsp almond or vanilla extract (optional)
• 1-2 tbsp water

For the ‘base:’
• 5 x heaped tbsp raspberry jam
• 100g frozen raspberries, just thawed

For the sponge:
• 100g ground almonds
• 100g self-raising flour
• 1 tsp baking powder
• 200g butter, melted
• 200g golden caster sugar (I used 20g of Hermesetas sweetener)
• ½ tsp almond extract
• 4 x eggs, beaten
• 4 x heaped tbsp apricot jam

To decorate:
• 25g almonds, slithered

Preparation
For the shortcrust pastry:
Sift the flour in a bowl, and add the sugar and salt. Melt the butter, ensuring that it’s all liquid, and tip into the flour whilst mixing and combining with a wooden spoon. Add the egg yolks and extract, and use the spoon to being it all together. Add the water if necessary, just enough to form a cohesive and slightly sticky dough with your hands. Form the dough into two discs, wrap with clingfilm and pop into the fridge for 30 minutes.

For the tart:
Preheat the oven to 190◦C. Roll out the pastry and line two 8” tart tins (I used silicon moulds; they’re very useful as there’s no need to butter the dish!). When rolling the dough out, it’s best to make sure it’s as cold as possible, and be generous with the flour when flouring the work surfaces. Also, make sure that the pastry hangs over the sides a little.

Pop the pastry into the oven for 8-10 minutes until it’s cooked, but not too coloured. Turn the oven down to 160◦C. Spread the raspberry jam across the bottom of the tart bases, and scatter the raspberries across.

Put the flour, sugar, ground almonds, butter, eggs, extract, baking powder and apricot jam into a bowl and mix until homogenous. Dollop into the pie dishes and sprinkle with flaked/slithered almonds. Bake for 35-40 minutes until golden and firm, and leave to cool.

These will freeze for up to 3 months, and can be served hot or cold!

Enjoy your Bakewell tart! :-)

Luxurious Fisherman’s Pie

Today, my grandmother from London came home with my dad! Dad works away all the time in London, where he slaves in his taxi for long hours with no sleep. This time when he came home, he brought nanny with him! She’ll be here for just over a week, before dad heads back to London again.

I whipped up this fish pie yesterday so that I wouldn’t be bashing around this morning while nanny and dad were asleep. I was also in Plymouth last night visiting my boyfriend, and was meant to go to the gym today, but missed it because I was so tired I actually slept in until 9! So by the time I got home and sorted myself out it was 10.30am, where I had a cup of tea and a chat with my mum and grandmum, and then we went off to pick Tim up from school. Oh well, at least tonight I’ll go to Kung Fu and play badminton, anyway.


This fish pie was really good. If I make it again, I’ll probably double the flour, butter and milk to have more béchamel sauce; it wasn’t dry, but it would have been nice with a bit more sauce. I suppose with more sauce, you could serve this dish to eight people with chips on the side! We had ours with salad, with a portion left over. :-)

Luxurious Fisherman’s Pie
Adapted from Asda Magazine, Dec ’10 Issue, page 50
Serves 6 large portions

Ingredients
• 550ml (semi-skimmed) milk
• 700-800g mixed fish (I used salmon, haddock and cod)
• 200-300g prawns
• 750g potatoes
• 1 x tin sweetcorn
• 1 x tin garden peas
• 5 x spring/salad onions
• 40g butter (2 x heaped tbsps)
• 50g flour
• ~100g grated cheese (I used cheddar)

Preparation
1. Preheat the oven to 200◦C.
2. Cook the potatoes (peeled and washed) in boiling water.
3. Poach the fish in the milk until cooked. Don’t bother to cut the fish up, just place it in its fillets (or however you bought it).
4. When the fish is cooked, remove it and leave to cool in a large baking dish. Pour the milk into a jug/reserve it for later.
5. Crumble the fish in the baking dish, and then add the prawns, sweet corn, peas, and diced spring onions. Mix it all together.
6. In the same pan, melt the butter, and then add the flour to make a roux. Cook for 1 minute.
7. Then gradually add the milk, and slowly bring to the boil, stirring constantly.
8. Pour the béchamel sauce over the ingredients in the baking dish, and stir all together.
9. When the potatoes are tender (which should be around now), drain and then mash them. The spread the mashed potato across the top of the ingredients in the baking dish.
10. Finish with a sprinkle of cheese, and place the fish pie into the oven for 30 minutes, or until the top is brown and crispy and the pie is hot throughout.

Enjoy y’arrr pie! :-)